Archived course lists

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Fall 2018

Course

Topic

Instructor

ASB 100

Introduction to Global Health

Anuj Mubayi

ASB 101

Anthropology: Understanding Human Diversity

Kim Hill

ASB 210

Human Sexuality: Anthropological Perspectives

Staff

ASB/BIO 294

Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary Medicine

Benjamin Trumble

ASB 494

Topic: Maternal and Child Health

Katie Hinde

ASB 305

Poverty and Global Health

Amber Wutich

ASB 355

Traditional Medicine and Healing

Jonathan Maupin

ASM 104

Bones, Stones/Human Evolution

Thomas Morgan, Kaye Reed

ASM 201

Epidemics and Outbreaks

Megan Jehn

ASM 300

Anthropological Sciences Seminar

Sarah Mathew

ASM 313

Great Adaptations

Joan Silk

ASM 443 / 543

Primatology

Ian Gilby

ASM 494

Evolutionary Medicine and Global Health

Hallie Edmonds

ASM 494 / 591

Topic: Models in Social Evolution

Kevin Langergraber

ASM 506

Clinical Gross Anatomy

Cheryl Hill, Shawn Zack

ASM 570

Fundamentals of CAS Science

Bryan Daniels, Manfred Laubichler

BIO 201

Human Anatomy/Physiology

Heather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps

BIO 202    

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Heather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps

BIO 302

Cancer-Mother of All Diseases

Carolyn Compton

BIO 311    

Biology and Society

Matthew Chew

BIO 340    

General Genetics

Reed Cartwright, Gillian Gile, Jesse Taylor

BIO 345

Evolution

Carlo Maley, Beckett Sterner

BIO 360

Animal Physiology

Marianne Moore, Miles Orchinik

BIO 361

Animal Physiology Laboratory

Nathan Smith, Sebastian Scofield

BIO 386    

General Entomology

Michael Jansen

BIO 394

Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary Psychology

Athena Aktipis

BIO 394

Topic: Evolution and Medicine Visiting Speaker Recitation

Melissa Wilson Sayres

BIO 431    

Genes, Development & Evolution

Jennifer Hackney Price

BIO 446 / 546

Principles of Human Genetics

Kevin Langergraber

BIO 461    

Comparative Animal Physiology

Dale Denardo

BIO 475    

Adv. Human Anatomy

Jeffrey Kingsdbury

BIO 494    

Topic: Genetics and Genomics of Behavior

Gro Amdam

BIO 494    

Topic: LEAP - Entering Research

Sara Brownell, Katelyn Cooper

BIO 494 / BIO 598 / EVO 598

Topic: Evolutionary Data Analysis

Susanne Pfeifer

BIO 498 / BIO 591

Topic: Population Genetic Reading Group

Jeffrey Jensen

BIO 522    

Populations: Evolutionary Ecology

James Collins

BIO 598    

Topic: Computing for Research

Melissa Wilson Sayres

BIO 790

Topic: Developmental Evolution

Manfred Laubichler

EVO 601   

Principles of Evolution

James Collins

EVO 610   

Research Areas of Evolution

Melissa Wilson Sayres

Spring 2018

*courses in bold are taught by CEM's core faculty.

CourseTopicInstructor
ASB 100Introduction to Global HealthMegan Jehn
ASB 101Anthropology: Understanding Human DiversityKim Hill
ASB 210Human Sexuality: Anthropological PerspectivesKatherine Hinde
ASB 294/ BIO 294Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary MedicineBenjamin Trumble
ASB 301Global History of HealthBrenda Baker
ASB 357Society, Drugs and HealthDaniel Hruschka
ASB 368Hunter-GatherersKim Hill
ASM 394 Evolution and Medicine Visiting Speaker RecitationAnne Stone
ASB 494/591Evolutionary MedicineRandolph Nesse
ASM 104Bones, Stones, and Human EvolutionChristopher Stojanowski, Ian Gilby
ASM 246Human OriginsJoan Silk
ASM 300Anthropological Sciences SeminarMichael Barton
ASM 301Peopling of the WorldAnne Stone
ASM 344Fossil HominidsWilliam Kimbel
ASM 401Health and Human BiologyAna Hurtado
ASM 494/598Evolutionary Medicine and Global Health
BIO 201 Human Anatomy and Physiology IHeather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps
BIO 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology IIHeather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps
BIO 302Cancer--Mother of All DiseasesCarolyn Compton
BIO 345EvolutionJeffrey Jensen, Christian Rabeling
BIO 360Animal PhysiologyMarianne Moore, Manuel Cevallos, Gro Amdam, Jon Harrison
BIO 370Vertebrate ZoologyPierre Deviche, Kevin McGraw
BIO 423Population and Community EcologyBenjamin Blonder
BIO 440Functional GenomicsKenneth Buetow
BIO 494/591Evolutionary MedicineRandolph Nesse
BIO 494The Evolution and Ecology of CancerDiego Mallo Adan
BIO 498Microbiome and Social BehaviorAthena Aktipis
BIO 543Molecular Genetics and GenomicsKenro Kusumi
BIO 545Populations Evolution GeneticsJesse Taylor
BIO 591Microbiome and Social BehaviorAthena Aktipis
BIO 598Dimensions of Complex SystemsManfred Laubichler
EVO 610Research Areas of EvolutionMelissa Wilson Sayres

Fall 2017

*courses in bold are taught by CEM's core faculty.

CourseTopicInstructor
ASB 100Introduction to Global HealthJonathan Maupin
ASB 101Anthropology: Understanding Human DiversityKevin Langergraber
ASB 210Human Sexuality: Anthropological PerspectivesSarah Mathew
ASB 294/ BIO 294Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary MedicineBenjamin Trumble
ASB 305Poverty and Global HealthAmber Wutich
ASB 368Hunter-GatherersCurtis Marean
ASB 462Medical Anthropology: Culture and HealthDaniel Hruschka
ASM 104Bones, Stones, and Human EvolutionThomas Morgan, Katie Hinde
ASM 201Epidemics and OutbreaksMegan Jehn
ASM 246Human OriginsRobert Boyd
ASM 300Anthropological Sciences SeminarAna Hurtado
ASM 301Peopling of the WorldCharles Perreault
ASM 345Disease and Human EvolutionAnne Stone
ASM 443/543PrimatologyIan Gilby
ASM 446Principles of Human GeneticsKevin Langergraber
ASM 506Clinical Gross AnatomyCheryl Hill, Anne Stone, Shawn Zack
ASM 570Fundamentals of CAS ScienceMichael Barton, Manfred Laubichler
BIO 201Human Anatomy and Physiology IHeather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps
BIO 202Human Anatomy and Physiology IIHeather Hutcherson, Delon Washo-Krupps
BIO 302Cancer-Mother of All DiseasesCarolyn Compton
BIO 311Biology and SocietyMatthew Chew
BIO 345EvolutionCarlo Maley, Martin Wojciechowski
BIO 360Animal PhysiologySara Brownell, Brian Haney, Miles Orchinik
BIO 385Comparative Invertebrate ZoologyJon Harrison
BIO 394Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary PsychologyAthena Aktipis
BIO 431Genes, Development, and EvolutionJennifer Hackney Price
BIO 498/598Populations Evolution GeneticsJeffrey Jensen
BIO 598Topic: The RNA World: A Genomics ApproachMarco Mangone
BIO 790Topic: Developmental EvolutionManfred Laubichler

Spring 2017

ASB 101 - Anthropology: Understanding Human Diversity- Kim Hill

Provides an integrated understanding of biological, historical, and cultural evolutionary processes that account for human variation. Specifically examines how humans evolved and how they obtained the characteristics that make us a unique species. Considers cultural and biological models of cooperation, resource acquisition and distribution, sex and marriage, parenting, conflict and warfare, political structures, power and status, sex roles, ritual, religion, and language.

ASB 368- Hunter- Gatherers- Kim Hill

Studies of known hunting and gathering societies with the goal of developing approaches to understanding past and/or present hunting and gathering societies.

ASB 510- Health: Social and Biocultural Theories- Daniel Hruschka

Comparative and critical approaches to complexities of health, drawn from anthropology and related fields Focuses on theories that address how social and cultural factors shape human health.

ASM 104- Bones, Stones, and Human Evolution – Christopher Campisano and Ian Gilby

Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evidence and processes of human evolution and of culture change. Primates. Fossil hominids and their tools. Race, variation, and heredity. Environment and human biology. Prehistoric culture and society.

ASM 246- Human Origins- Joan Silk

History of discoveries and changing interpretations of human evolution. Earliest ancestors to emergence of modern humans. Humanity's place in nature. 

ASM 294 Topic: Evolution and Medicine- Benjamin Trumbe

This course is designed to introduce the basics of evolutionary medicine to students. Topics ranging from the evolution of antibiotic resistance, to aging, obesity and cancer will be discussed using an evolutionary framework to better understand how these issues came to be, and what can be done to prevent/treat/mitigate these conditions.

ASM 294 Topic: Building Babies- Katie Hinde

Course Description: How do we, as individuals, become who we are- our personalities, our health, our bodies? These outcomes are in part shaped by our early life experiences, nutrition, health, and culture. Here we survey the processes of early life development drawing on research from global health, anthropology, biology, psychology, nutrition, neurobiology, and medical sciences.

Course Goals: At the end of the term, the student will be familiar with inter-disciplinary perspectives of development, animal models for understanding human development, and the steps from bench to bedside to population- how research is translated into clinical care and global health policy. The students will gain insights into the importance of transdisciplinary approaches to human health and development and the contributions of integrating evolutionary and cross-cultural perspectives to medicine. Students will gain skills in science communication, critical thinking, writing, hypothesis generating, and data interpretation.

ASM 301- Peopling of the World- Anne Stone

Reviews all evidence for human dispersal during the last 100,000 years, origins of language, cultures, races, and beginnings of modern humans. 

ASM 456- Infectious Disease and Human Evolution- Magdalena Hurtado

Study of infectious disease and humanity, using evidence from anthropology, history, medicine, and ancient skeletons.

ASM 494/ BIO 494/ PSY 494/598- Topic: Evolution and Mental Disorders- Randolph Nesse

This course offers an overview of evolutionary approaches to mental disorders. It addresses how to frame and test hypotheses about evolutionary explanations for why brain/minds are vulnerable certain kinds of failure. The course will review historical studies of medical Darwinism and the tragic results. These will be contrasted with attempts late in the 20th century to use principles from sociobiology to understand mental disorders. We will read crucially a selection of studies from that period. A substantial focus will be on evolutionary origins and functions of emotions and motivation, and how they can be used to help understand emotional disorders. Newer attempts to apply behavioral ecology will be the foundation for individual/group projects that will culminate in writing a proposal for research on a specific topic.

A special feature of this year's course will be reading and commenting on draft chapters from my forthcoming book, "The Origin of Mental Maladies: Evolutionary Foundations for Psychiatry" 

BIO 201/202 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II

Studies the structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic/immune, endocrine, renal, digestive, and reproductive systems. Cannot be used for major credit in the life sciences.

BIO 302 Cancer- Mother of all Diseases- Carolyn Compton

History of cancer; disease statistics; pathogenesis; diagnosis, treatment and prevention; case studies.

BIO 345 Evolution- Michael Rosenberg and Melissa Wilson Sayres

Processes of adaptive change and speciation in sexual populations. 

BIO 394/PSY 394 Topic: Introduction to Evolutionary Psychology- Athena Aktipis

What is human nature? How has it been shaped by our evolutionary history? How do ecological factors influence human behavior and the behavior of other species? This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to behavior, incorporating psychological, anthropological and cross-species perspectives in an exploration of what makes us who we are.

BIO 494 Topic: The Evo and Ecology of Cancer- Carlo Maley and Marc Tollis

BIO 494- Topic: Stress and the Brain- Miles Orchinik

BIO 498 Topic: Pathologies of the Aging Brain- Salvatore Oddo

Students will learn about the molecular causes and clinical consequences of major age-dependent neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). Guest lectures by neurologists will facilitate a better understanding of the clinical aspect of these pathologies. Students will read and discuss scientific literature to study current theories and hypotheses regarding the development of these diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 360 with a C or better

BIO 498/594 Topic: Populations Evolution Genetics- Jay Taylor

EVO 610 Research Areas of Evolution- Melissa Wilson Sayres

Broadly conceived description of the current research areas of evolutionary biology. Expected of all first-year evolution students.

 

Fall 2016 Courses

 

ASB/SSH 301 Global History of Health- Monica Green

Examines disease and health transitions in broadest context of human history, from primate ancestors to hunter-gatherers, to transcontinental contact, colonialism, industrialization, urbanization.

ASM 104 - Bones, Stones, and Human Evolution – Gary Schwartz  

Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evidence and processes of human evolution and of culture change. Primates. Fossil hominids and their tools. Race, variation, and heredity. Environment and human biology. Prehistoric culture and society.

ASM 246 - Human Origins - Robert Boyd

History of discoveries and changing interpretations of human evolution. Earliest ancestors to emergence of modern humans. Humanity's place in nature.

ASM 294 Building Babies- Katie Hinde

How do we, as individuals, become who we are- how we're shaped, how we perceive our world, how we act? These outcomes are in part shaped by our early life experiences, nutrition, health, and culture. Here we survey the processes of early life development drawing on research from global health, anthropology, biology, psychology, nutrition, neurobiology, and medical sciences. At the end of the term, the student will be familiar with inter-disciplinary perspectives of development, animal models for understanding human development, and the steps from bench to bedside- how research is translated into clinical care. Students will gain skills science communication, critical thinking, writing, hypothesis generating, and data interpretation.

ASM 345 - Disease and Human Evolution

Interaction of people and pathogens from prehistoric times to the present, with emphasis on disease as an agent of genetic selection.

ASM 394 - Topic: Great Adaptations - Joan Silk

ASM 443/543 – Primatology - Kevin Langergraber

Evolution and adaptations of nonhuman primates, emphasizing social behavior. Includes material from fossil evidence and field and lab studies in behavior and biology which must be critically integrated with relevant competing theories concerning the evolution of primate behavior and biology.

ASM 446/546 Principle of Human Genetics- Anne Stone

Molecular and cellular analysis of the human genome.

ASM 506 Clinical Gross Anatomy-Cheryl Hill, Shawn Zack

Dissection of the human body with an emphasis on the application of anatomical knowledge to clinical applications. BIO 546- Principles of Human Genetics- Anne Stone

Examines human molecular genetics from an evolutionary perspective, particularly analysis, current debates, the Human Genome Project, disease, ethics.

BIO 598 - Topic: The RNA World: A Genomics Approach- Marco Mangone

Hereditary information flows through the usage of extraordinarily complex machinery from DNA to protein through RNA intermediates. Why do these intermediates exist and how did this machinery arise? One theory suggests that an RNA world existed on earth before modern cells arose, and that RNA molecules catalyzed the chemical reactions and stored the genetic information in this early world. When compared with other biochemical compounds, the RNA molecule is special. Since it's a single-strand polymer, it folds in an infinite number of biologically active shapes, catalyzing biochemical reactions, transport biochemical complexes in different cellular complexes, and significantly rewrite the gene expression output of a cell. This course explores the RNA world hypothesis, providing a comprehensive advanced knowledge of RNA biology using a genomics approach. Classical experiments as well as up-to-date research are covered in this course. A portion of each class is devoted to discussion and questions.

ASM 570 Fundamentals of CAS Science- Manfred Laubichler, Michael Barton

Many phenomena of critical relevance to human society are dynamic systems that change over individual and evolutionary time scales, and are highly interactive, both within and between systems. That is, they are complex adaptive systems (CAS), and thus share isomorphic properties like near-decomposability, hierarchical organization, scale-free networks, self-organized criticality, and emergence. Fundamentals of CAS science explores the diverse, interdisciplinary applications of a complex adaptive systems across the social, behavioral, and life sciences.

BIO 201 Anatomy and Physiology I- Heather Scott

Studies the structure and function of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. Cannot be used for major credit in the life sciences.

BIO 202 Anatomy and Physiology II-Jeffrey Kingsbury, Jennifer Legere

Studies the structure and function of the human body. Topics include cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic/immune, endocrine, renal, digestive, and reproductive systems. Cannot be used for major credit in the life sciences.

BIO 302 Cancer- Mother of all diseases- Carolyn Compton

History of cancer; disease statistics; pathogenesis; diagnosis, treatment and prevention; case studies.

BIO 311 - Biology and Society- Matthew Chew, Manfred Laubichler

Explores interactions between biological sciences and society, e.g., biomedical, environmental, ethical, historical, legal, philosophical, political, and social issues.

BIO 318 - History of Medicine - Ben Hurlbut, Jane Maienschein

Scientific study of the human body, changing theories of disease, evolution of practical opinions on treatment, and the emerging institutionalization of medical practice.

BIO 345 - Evolution - Martin Wojciechowski, Juergen Gadau, Udo Savalli

Processes of adaptive change and speciation in sexual populations.

BIO 431 - Genes, Development, and Evolution - Jennifer Hackney Price

Contribution of genes, developmental processes, and evolution to pattern of phenotypic variation, including disease.

BIO 522 - Populations: Evolutionary Ecology – James Collins

Principles of population biology and community ecology within an evolutionary framework.

BIO 545 - Populations: Evolutionary Genetics - Philip Hedrick

Mathematical models in the description and analysis of the genetics of populations.

BIO 790 - Topic: Developmental Evolution - Manfred Laubichler

Independent study in which a student meets regularly with a faculty member to discuss assignments. Course may include such assignments as intensive reading in a specialized area, writing a synthesis of literature on a specified topic, or writing a literature review of a topic.

EVO 601 - Principles of Evolution – James Collins

Introductory course for graduate students; covers the principles of evolutionary biology from theoretical, empirical, and historical perspectives.

EVO 610 - Research Areas of Evolution

Broadly conceived description of the current research areas of evolutionary biology. Expected of all first-year evolution students.

PSY 591 - Topic: Evolutionary Psychology - Douglas Kenrick

A small class emphasizing discussion, presentations by students, and written research papers.

 

Spring 2016

Evolution and medicine courses

ASB 294 Building Babies- Katie Hinde

How do we, as individuals, become who we are- how we're shaped, how we perceive our world, how we act? These outcomes are in part shaped by our early life experiences, nutrition, health, and culture. Here we survey the processes of early life development drawing on research from global health, anthropology, biology, psychology, nutrition, neurobiology, and medical sciences. At the end of the term, the student will be familiar with inter-disciplinary perspectives of development, animal models for understanding human development, and the steps from bench to bedside- how research is translated into clinical care. Students will gain skills science communication, critical thinking, writing, hypothesis generating, and data interpretation. 

ASM 342 Evolution of Human Behavior- Sarah Mathew

Examines how evolutionary theory informs our understanding of human behavior, psychology and culture. Explores evolutionary explanations of human behavioral variation and cultural diversity and the influence of natural selection on shaping human cognition. Topics include nepotism, economic decisions, behavioral strategies throughout the life course, mate choice and sexual behavior, perception and judgment, motivation and emotions, social learning and culture, cooperation and prosociality, interpersonal violence and warfare, and norms and moral sentiments.

BIO 394/ PSY 395 Topic: Evolution, Ecology and Behavior- Athena Aktipis

BIO 494 Deep Evolution- Gillian Gile

Origins, evolution and diversity of microbes.

BIO 494/591 Topic: Evolutionary Medicine- Randolph Nesse

This seminar teaches how to apply the principles of evolutionary biology to problems in medicine and public health, and how the study of disease can advance our understanding of evolutionary biology. The emphasis is on how to formulate and test evolutionary hypotheses about vulnerability to disease, using the six categories that Williams and I proposed in Why We Get Sick: The New Science of Evolutionary Medicine. We will also use a new textbook, just published by Stearns and Medzhitov. The seminar will emphasize natural selection more than phylogeny. 

BIO 494/591Topic: The Evolution and Ecology of Cancer- Carlo Maley

 

Courses related to evolution and medicine

ASB 101 Anthropology: Understanding Human Diversity- Kevin Langergraber

Provides an integrated understanding of biological, historical, and cultural evolutionary processes that account for human variation. Specifically examines how humans evolved and how they obtained the characteristics that make us a unique species. Considers cultural and biological models of cooperation, resource acquisition and distribution, sex and marriage, parenting, conflict and warfare, political structures, power and status, sex roles, ritual, religion, and language.

ASB 210 Human Sexuality: Anthropological Perspectives- Gary Schwartz

Examines the sexual nature and behavior of humans from both a biological and an anthropological point of view across various cultures around the globe.

ASB 368 Hunter Gatherers

Studies of known hunting and gathering societies with the goal of developing approaches to understanding past and/or present hunting and gathering societies.

ASB 410 Poverty, Social Justice, and Global Health- Amber Wutich

From perspectives of anthropology and allied fields, explores critical, social justice, and ethical issues in health care, research, and disparities. Focuses on vulnerable and special populations.

ASM 104 Bones, Stones & Human Evolution- Ian Gilby

Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evidence and processes of human evolution and of culture change. Primates. Fossil hominids and their tools. Race, variation, and heredity. Environment and human biology. Prehistoric culture and society.

ASM 525 Primate Paleobiology- William Kimbel

Seminar-based survey of primate evolution, focusing on comparative biology of the extant primates and the fossil record through the Miocene.

BIO 345 Organic Evolution- Melissa Wilson Sayers

Processes of adaptive change and speciation in sexual populations. 

BIO 360 Animal Physiology- Brian Smith

Principles and mechanisms of physiological regulation in animals, with a focus on humans.

BIO 385 Comparative Invertebrate Zoology- Jon Harrison

Characteristics, life cycles, adaptations, and evolution of invertebrate animals.

BIO 440/MBB 440/ MCB 540 Functional Genomics- Kenneth Buetow

Covers emerging fields of genomics and proteomics. Discusses key technologies and their applications to the study of genomes.

BIO 494/598, MBB 494/MCB 598 Genomic Analysis- Reed Cartwright

BIO 498/591, HPS 498/591, HON 497 Topic: Embryo Project Seminar- Jane Maienschein

This seminar will introduce selected students to the National Science Foundation funded Embryo Project. Students will learn about the international network of scholars developing an exciting new online encyclopedia through a collaboratory virtual laboratory working environment. Each student will write entries for the encyclopedia, which may be published in the encyclopedia once they are accepted and edited. A few students may also be invited to write interpretive essays, in some cases in connection with honors theses, that will be reviewed and published as part of the project. Admission is limited and highly selective, and students must apply for this unique experience. Typically, upper level students with experience in writing and with some research skills, and those with serious interest in development and reproductive issues will feel most comfortable in this course. To apply, please visit the Center for Biology and Society in Life Sciences C-Wing room 284. 

BIO 498/ BIO 591 Sociogenomics- Juergen Gadau

This seminar will review concepts and methods used in Sociogenomics as well as discuss recent findings about the genetic and genomic architecture of social behavior. Hence, we will cover both meanings of Sociogenomics: 1. the study of the genomes of social organism and 2. The study of the genomic basis of social behavior. The seminar will be a combination of lectures, literature discussion and student presentation. 

EVO 598 Topic: Software Carpentry- Reed Cartwright

EVO 610 Research Areas of Evolution- Michael Rosenberg          

Broadly conceived description of the current research areas of evolutionary biology.

Fall 2015

The list of courses below are relevant for those with interests in evolutionary theory and its application for health and disease. Not all classes have an explicit focus on evolutionary medicine, but do cover topics relevants to the field. Many classes are taught by CEM faculty and include coursework in anthropology and biology. 

Fall 2015 Classes

ASB 191 Topic: Evolutionary Anthropology of Current Events- Kim Hill

Recently emerging academic fields such as Evolutionary Psychology, Human Behavioral Ecology, Evolutionary Medicine, Cultural Evolution, Evolutionary Economics, etc. are all united in the belief that understanding basic evolutionary processes that created human cognition and physiology can allow us to explain much of human behavior. If this is true, we should be able to use an evolutionary perspective, along with empirical research inspired by it, to more deeply understand all aspects of the modern world in which humans interact or are agents of change. In this course we will examine that premise, by selecting ongoing US and World news stories and exploring the extent to which a deeper understanding of current events can be derived from applying insights from evolutionary anthropology. We will examine things like wars, politics, sexual patterns, disease and health problems, entertainment trends, fashion, and others, picking a current important news story each week for deeper examination and discussion. 

ASM 104 Bones, Stones, and Human Evolution- Kaye Reed

Physical anthropology and archaeology. Evidence and processes of human evolution and of culture change. Primates. Fossil hominids and their tools. Race, variation, and heredity. Environment and human biology. Prehistoric culture and society.

ASM 345 Disease and Human Evolution- Anne Stone

Interaction of people and pathogens from prehistoric times to the present, with emphasis on disease as an agent of genetic selection.

BIO 345 Organic Evolution- Juergen Gadau

Processes of adaptive change and speciation in sexual populations. 

BIO 431 Genes, Development and Evolution- Jennifer Hackney Price

Contribution of genes, developmental processes, and evolution to pattern of phenotypic variation, including disease. 

BIO 494 Topic: Decoding Sex- Melissa Wilson Sayres

Birds do it, bees do it, and even educated fleas do it, but how? This course covers the evolution of sex determination mechanisms across plants and animals. We will ask how separate sexes evolved, study the range of sex determination mechanisms, investigate why some species have only two sexes (and why some have more!), learn about the effects of sexual selection, and delve into the unique features of genetic sex determination. We will cover modern sequencing technology and its uses for studying sex chromosome divergence and diversity. Finally, we will discuss common misunderstandings about biological sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation. 

BIO 598 Evolutionary Biology of Parasites and Pathogens- Ananias Escalante

Parasitism is one of the most successful strategies in nature. There is a large number of species that are considered parasitic; it is a convergent strategy that emerged independently in several evolutionary lineages. This life history strategy, however, is sometime addressed solely for its consequences to the host. Thus, parasites and pathogens are sometime characterized for what they do rather than for what they are. The main objective of this seminar is to discuss relevant papers on the evolution of parasites and pathogens. Good management of ecological and evolutionary concepts is expected. A set of review papers revising such concepts will be provided in order to ensure a high level discussion. 

BIO 790- Topic: Developmental Evolution-Manfred Laubichler (Independent Study)

EVO 610- Research Areas of Evolution- Michael Rosenberg

Broadly conceived description of the current research areas of evolutionary biology. Expected of all first-year evolution students.