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Flamingos have heart attacks, tigers get breast cancer, gorillas can have eating disorders and dragon flies get obese. Why do animals get the same diseases people do? UCLA Professor of Medicine Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, M.D. explains the potential answers in her seminar, "Not Uniquely Human."

The guy at work who contributes squat to a team project. The one who develops alligator arms every time the check arrives. The people you’ve had for dinner 20 times who always show up empty-handed.

Does it make you feel any better that ants, bees and wasps suffer from similar company?

Arizona State University’s first Cooperation and Conflict Symposium was held Thursday, bringing scholars from around campus and the world to discuss “Solving the problem of cheating in large-scale cooperative systems.”

If you want to know the future, study the past. Confucius said it. Anne Stone embodies it.

One part Indiana Jones; one part Charles Darwin; one part Jane Goodall: Stone has unearthed the secrets of a prehistoric Native American community, conducted the first analysis of Neanderthal DNA and revealed the surprising level of genetic diversity among chimpanzees.

Darwinian medicine applies modern evolutionary theory to understanding health and disease, with the goal of understanding why people get sick, not simply how. Building upon that, a concept called zoobiquity explores human and animal commonalities to diagnose and treat health problems — after all, koala bears get cancer and flamingos can have heart attacks, but physicians and veterinarians rarely consult with one another. It's the subject of a talk hosted this week by ASU's Center for Evolution and Medicine.

ASUs Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM) on the Tempe campus is looking for a conscientious, dependable and self-motivated student to assist the Center Director with fact checking, reference management and editing for a book he is writing on evolutionary explanations for mental disorders. See his webpage at http://randolphnesse.com
Postdoctoral Research Associate – Center for Evolution and Medicine, Arizona State University #11855
The CompHEALTH lab at Arizona State University is seeking a postdoctoral researcher with an anticipated start date in spring of 2017. The full-time, benefits-eligible position is renewable on an annual basis (July 1 – June 30), contingent upon satisfactory performance, availability of resources, and the needs of the university.

CEM Faculty member Benjamin Trumble uncovers genetic mysteries in the modern world.

In a recent interview with ABC 15, CEM faculty member Melissa Wilson Sayres weighs in on the accu

The 2017 meeting of the International Society of Evolution, Medicine & Public Health will take place August 18-21, in Groningen in conjunction with the XVIth European Society for Evolutionary Biology Meeting. 

The Center for Evolution & Medicine is seeking a creative, organized and skilled individual to work under general supervision and take on responsibility for communications and event planning in a team-oriented, highly motivated, small, but fast-paced, environment.  

Center for Evolution & Medicine Associate Director, Anne Stone, has been named a Rege

ASU biologist Melissa Wilson Sayres — whose banana-DNA demo will be one of scores of interactive booths — says it's key for people to meet scientists face to face.

The Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM) at Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications from exceptional early career scientists for the Evolution & Medicine Research Fellowship. 

Assistant/Associate Professor (JOB #11741)
Arizona State University

UCSD/Salk/CARTA and ASU’s Center for Evolution and Medicine partner to increase understanding of human evolutionary biology and its application to medicine and health

Pinpointing the origin of changes could aid in treatment of disease-associated mutations

Do you avoid squats at the gym?

The Center for Evolution & Medicine hosted their Fall Featured Speaker, Ed Yong for a lecture on his new book, I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes within us and a Grander View of Life (2016)

The 2016 meeting on the International Society of Evolution, Medicine & Public Health took place on June 22-25th in Durham, North Carolina.

In April 2015, a collaboration between The Center for Evolution & Medicine and The Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) hosted Ancient DNA and Human Evolution, a public symposium. Videos are now available here

The Evolution of Psychopathology was the theme of this year's Evolutionary Psychology Interdisciplinary Conference Series. 

Human well being often flourishes under conditions of cooperation with others and flounders during periods of external conflict and strife.

More than 150 years has passed since the publication of On the Origin of Species. Nevertheless, only recently has Darwin’s dangerous idea started to be applied to understand and explain human health.

Physicians for Ancestral Health is an international organization for medical doctors (MDs, DOs, and international equivalents), medical students and residents of all specialties

The Evolutionary Genomics of Sex Conference will be hosted in Tempe, Arizona from November 17-19, 2016. #ExSex16

With a focus on ‘Evolution… revolution… solutions in perio’, the conference saw hundreds of delegates flock to the Oxford Examination Schools to hear presentations from visionary and inspiring speakers from all over the world.

Symptoms of illness are not inevitably tied to an underlying disease --rather, many organisms, including humans, adapt their symptom expression to suit their needs. That's the finding of Arizona State University's Leonid Tiokhin, whose research appears in the Quarterly Review of Biology.

Evolution can be an emotionally charged topic in education, given a wide range of perspectives

Anne Stone, Associate Director of ASU’s Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM), Director of th

The largest-ever study of global genetic variation in the human Y chromosome has uncovered the hidden genetic history of men.

In honor of National DNA Day on April 25th, Ask a Biologist’s Dr.

The Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM) at Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications from exceptional early career scientists for the Evolution & Medicine Research Fellowship.

It was her very first encounter with a strangely beautiful orange and black beaded Arizona native, the Gila monster — one of only two venomous lizards in the world — that convinced Melissa Wilson Sayres to divert from her 11-year path of studying mammal genomes.

Help an ASU research team explore the link between gila monsters and Type-II diabetes 

Katie Hinde was recognized by the International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation

KJZZ Radio interviewed CEM Faculty member Melissa Wilson Sayres about her research on on X and Y chromosome swapping. This research suggests that human gender may be more fluid than was once thought.

All living creatures have DNA including the friends we meet and the bananas we eat! The Wilsons Sayres Lab at ASU is working to uncover the mysteries hidden in DNA and they are getting help from some of their youngest friends. The lab set out last weekend to help children discover that every living thing has DNA by extracting samples from bananas at ASU’s annual Night at the Open Door event.

Health@ASU is a new website highlighting the many facets of health research and outreach at ASU. The site is aimed to speak to a broad audience and “make sense from a macro view of health and health care.” The Center for Evolution & Medicine is one of the many initiatives featured on the site.

Could you tame a tumor? Children of all ages (and some adults, too) tested their medical prowess and learned about evolution and cancer with members of Dr. Athena Aktipis’ Lab at ASU’s annual Night at the Open door event.

Mammal March Madness has begun! Can a Giant Mole Rat defeat the Giant Forest Hog? Will the Snow Leopard defeat the Siberian Chipmunk?