Transforming our
understanding of disease.

The ASU Center for Evolution & Medicine
is a university-wide Presidential Initiative whose mission is to improve human health by establishing evolutionary biology as an essential basic science for medicine, worldwide.
Thursday, September 29, 2016 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSE 244
Professor, Department of Evolutionary Biology
University of Oxford
Social evolution in microbes: from model systems to the microbiome 
Thursday, October 13, 2016 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Edward P. Bass Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 
Yale University
On the nature of tradeoffs
Thursday, October 20, 2016 -
12:00pm - 1:15pm
LSC 202
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Impact of major pandemics on immune response variation in the primate order
 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor, Department of Anthropology
University of New Mexico
Research interests: Evolution of human life course

The Center for Evolution & Medicine hosted their Fall Featured Speaker, Ed Yong for a lecture on his new book, I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes within us and a Grander View of Life (2016)

The 2016 meeting on the International Society of Evolution, Medicine & Public Health took place on June 22-25th in Durham, North Carolina.

In April 2015, a collaboration between The Center for Evolution & Medicine and The Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) hosted Ancient DNA and Human Evolution, a public symposium. Videos are now available here

The Evolution of Psychopathology was the theme of this year's Evolutionary Psychology Interdisciplinary Conference Series. 

This week is the 2nd annual meeting of the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health . The presentations we'll see, and the conversations we’ll have, were instigated 25 years ago as George Williams and I discussed and grappled with how evolution could be useful for medicine, and what...
Cancer is bad. For sure. About 2 in 5 of us will develop cancer in our lifetimes and 1 in 5 of us will die of cancer. So there is no question that cancer is bad. But is cancer all bad? Are there cases where susceptibility to cancer is associated with things that we would consider good?
“ Do you feel tired ?” asks the silver fox in his outdoor jacket, wind in his hair. He then suggests that you may suffer from low testosterone, which apparently is a serious condition that could be impacting “millions of men.” Evidently the solution, he suggests, is just a prescription drug away. Next time...
In December 2013, in the village of Meliandou, Guinea, a dangerous pathogen jumped from a bat into a little boy. He may have been playing among the trees where bats roost, coming into contact with bat guano; the details are uncertain. But several days later, as the pathogen replicated exponentially in his...