The ASU Center for Evolution & Medicine
is a university-wide Presidential Initiative whose mission is to improve human health by establishing evolutionary biology as an essential basic science for medicine, worldwide.
Thursday, April 27, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor
Institute of Science and Technology, Austria
Disease defense in Insect Societies
 
The organizational immunity hypothesis proposes that social insect colonies are organized in a way to reduce disease transmission and thus the risk of epidemics in their colonies. It is expected, (i) that the inherent colony sub-structuring into different communities hinders pathogen spread towards the most valuable colony member, the queen, and (ii) that changes in the social interaction network upon colony infection should further impede disease transmission. We test this hypothesis in ants by observing whole-colony interactions before and after pathogen exposure.

The Center for Evolution is once again accepting applications for its Venture Fund, with the goal of connecting evolutionary biology and topics related to medicine or public health. The fund provides opportunities for ASU/Mayo faculty and students to earn funding of a research project.

Scientists know more about tomatoes than breast milk, and that's a problem for Center for Evolution and Medicine faculty member Katie Hinde.

Evolution and religion often evoke strong emotional responses that can seem undeniably incompatible. Yet, researchers at Arizona State University have discovered that using a short, evolution teaching module focused on the perceived conflict between religion and evolution actually reduced the number of students with this perception by 50 percent — a big success considering about half of all undergraduate students identify as religious.

CEM Faculty member Benjamin Trumble, as part of a larger research team, has discovered that the Tsimané of the Bolivian Amazon have the healthiest hearts in the world. His study was published in the Lancet medical journal and details the many reasons why this group of people have the heart health of a mid-50-year-old at age 80.

This week is the 2nd annual meeting of the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health . The presentations we'll see, and the conversations we’ll have, were instigated 25 years ago as George Williams and I discussed and grappled with how evolution could be useful for medicine, and what...
Cancer is bad. For sure. About 2 in 5 of us will develop cancer in our lifetimes and 1 in 5 of us will die of cancer. So there is no question that cancer is bad. But is cancer all bad? Are there cases where susceptibility to cancer is associated with things that we would consider good?
“ Do you feel tired ?” asks the silver fox in his outdoor jacket, wind in his hair. He then suggests that you may suffer from low testosterone, which apparently is a serious condition that could be impacting “millions of men.” Evidently the solution, he suggests, is just a prescription drug away. Next time...