The ASU Center for Evolution & Medicine
is a university-wide Presidential Initiative whose mission is to improve human health by establishing evolutionary biology as an essential basic science for medicine, worldwide.
Thursday, March 30, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor of Asian Studies
Associate member, Depts of Philosophy and Psychology
Director, Database of Religious History
The University of British Columbia
Mind-Body Dualism in Early China: Implications for the Human and Cognitive Sciences
 
This talk will draw on a wide variety of evidence to debunk this Orientalist myth of holism, including archeological findings, traditional close reading of texts, novel large-scale textual analysis techniques, and work in contemporary evolutionary anthropology and cognitive science.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor
Institute of Science and Technology, Austria
 
*more info coming soon
 

CEM Faculty member Benjamin Trumble, as part of a larger research team, has discovered that the Tsimané of the Bolivian Amazon have the healthiest hearts in the world. His study was published in the Lancet medical journal and details the many reasons why this group of people have the heart health of a mid-50-year-old at age 80.

The stomach of a house finch might hold secrets to how humans absorb nutrients, age and deal with the omniprescence of nighttime light pollution.

Who would win in a fight between a Snow Leopard, a Red Giant Flying Squirrel, a Fisher and a Rhesus Macaque? This Monday, the four will duke it out in the opening, wild card bout of the fifth annual March Mammal Madness tournament.

The Caribbean is a perfect candidate to study a genetically diverse population. Hundreds of years ago, Europeans colonized the islands and started mixing with both the native people and the African salves they brought with them. Since each of those groups had adapted differently to their home continents for thousands of years before coming back together, there were plenty of genetic differences. That kind of intermingling, if studied, could lead to new drug therapies and a better understanding disease susceptibility.

This week is the 2nd annual meeting of the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health . The presentations we'll see, and the conversations we’ll have, were instigated 25 years ago as George Williams and I discussed and grappled with how evolution could be useful for medicine, and what...
Cancer is bad. For sure. About 2 in 5 of us will develop cancer in our lifetimes and 1 in 5 of us will die of cancer. So there is no question that cancer is bad. But is cancer all bad? Are there cases where susceptibility to cancer is associated with things that we would consider good?
“ Do you feel tired ?” asks the silver fox in his outdoor jacket, wind in his hair. He then suggests that you may suffer from low testosterone, which apparently is a serious condition that could be impacting “millions of men.” Evidently the solution, he suggests, is just a prescription drug away. Next time...