Projects

Learn about the exciting research taking place at CEM.

Labs

Faculty in the Center for Evolution and Medicine work in a highly collaborative environment. Learn more about their labs.

Grants

CEM faculty receive funding from a variety of sources to support their research.

Funding Opportunities

The CEM helps support research in evolution & medicine through grants to ASU faculty and fellowships for post-docs and faculty from other institutions.

Discovering Evolutionary Explanations for Disease

The Center for Evolution & Medicine supports interdisciplinary research by bridging the many different disciplines (e.g. infectious disease, genetics, clinical medicine, veterinary medicine, anthropology, psychology, etc.) where relevant research takes place. Research at the Center demonstrates the power of evolutionary biology to address problems in medicine and public health.

  • ASU will recruit 8 new faculty researchers for the Center in the next 3 years to augment existing expertise at ASU and the Mayo Clinic.

  • Priority areas include cancer, preventing antibiotic resistance, the microbiome, evolutionary genetics, and diseases of modern environments.

  • Some Center sponsored research is about human disease, but other projects are about disease in other species, or about basic questions such as the origins of mechanisms that control mutation rates.

Thursday, March 2, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Johann Friedrich Miescher Regents Professor in Molecular Biology
Department of Integrative Biology
University of Texas at Austin
Evolution of Genomes Engineered for Disease Control
 
Genetic Engineering now enables the design of many transmissible interventions in disease control. This talk will introduce the spectrum of new-feasible transmissible disease interventions, evaluate prospects for short-term evolution to undermine them, and suggest engineering designs that may thwart the unwanted evolution.
Thursday, March 23, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas
Universidad Veracruzana
Developmental plasticity and human reproductive function: The devil is in the details
 
In this talk, she will review what we know (and don´t) about developmental plasticity of human reproductive function, analyze its impact on current epidemiological and demographic trends and highlight the contribution of an evolutionary viewpoint to our understanding of such patterns, particularly in the context of rapidly changing socio-economic and ecological systems worldwide. 
Thursday, March 30, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor of Asian Studies
Associate member, Depts of Philosophy and Psychology
Director, Database of Religious History
The University of British Columbia
Mind-Body Dualism in Early China: Implications for the Human and Cognitive Sciences
 
This talk will draw on a wide variety of evidence to debunk this Orientalist myth of holism, including archeological findings, traditional close reading of texts, novel large-scale textual analysis techniques, and work in contemporary evolutionary anthropology and cognitive science.
 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor
Institute of Science and Technology, Austria
 
*more info coming soon
 

Flamingos have heart attacks, tigers get breast cancer, gorillas can have eating disorders and dragon flies get obese. Why do animals get the same diseases people do? UCLA Professor of Medicine Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, M.D. explains the potential answers in her seminar, "Not Uniquely Human."

The guy at work who contributes squat to a team project. The one who develops alligator arms every time the check arrives. The people you’ve had for dinner 20 times who always show up empty-handed.

Does it make you feel any better that ants, bees and wasps suffer from similar company?

Arizona State University’s first Cooperation and Conflict Symposium was held Thursday, bringing scholars from around campus and the world to discuss “Solving the problem of cheating in large-scale cooperative systems.”

If you want to know the future, study the past. Confucius said it. Anne Stone embodies it.

One part Indiana Jones; one part Charles Darwin; one part Jane Goodall: Stone has unearthed the secrets of a prehistoric Native American community, conducted the first analysis of Neanderthal DNA and revealed the surprising level of genetic diversity among chimpanzees.