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The Center for Evolution & Medicine

427 E. Tyler Mall, Life Sciences C wing, Admin suite 210
Tempe, AZ 85287-4501
480-965-9944

Discover More

Thursday, April 27, 2017 -
12:00pm - 1:00pm
LSC 202
Professor
Institute of Science and Technology, Austria
Disease defense in Insect Societies
 
The organizational immunity hypothesis proposes that social insect colonies are organized in a way to reduce disease transmission and thus the risk of epidemics in their colonies. It is expected, (i) that the inherent colony sub-structuring into different communities hinders pathogen spread towards the most valuable colony member, the queen, and (ii) that changes in the social interaction network upon colony infection should further impede disease transmission. We test this hypothesis in ants by observing whole-colony interactions before and after pathogen exposure.

The Center for Evolution is once again accepting applications for its Venture Fund, with the goal of connecting evolutionary biology and topics related to medicine or public health. The fund provides opportunities for ASU/Mayo faculty and students to earn funding of a research project.

Scientists know more about tomatoes than breast milk, and that's a problem for Center for Evolution and Medicine faculty member Katie Hinde.

Evolution and religion often evoke strong emotional responses that can seem undeniably incompatible. Yet, researchers at Arizona State University have discovered that using a short, evolution teaching module focused on the perceived conflict between religion and evolution actually reduced the number of students with this perception by 50 percent — a big success considering about half of all undergraduate students identify as religious.