EvMedBlog Contributors

Randolph M. Nesse

Dr. Randolph M. Nesse, the Founding Director of the ASU Center for Evolution & Medicine and Professor in the School of Life Sciences at ASU, is a physician who has dedicated his career to establishing evolutionary biology as a basic science for medicine. His investigations of the neuro-endocrinology of anxiety, aging, and evolution led to a series of publications that established the field of evolutionary medicine.

 

Magdalena Hurtado

Dr. Magdalena Hurtado, Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at ASU and 2015-2016 Bass Distinguished Visiting Environmental Scholar in Anthropology at Yale University, investigates mortality reduction mechanisms in humans with an emphasis on cultural niche construction and innate immunity. Spanning three decades, Dr. Hurtado has conducted extensive field work in Panama, Paraguay, and Venezuela among the Machiguenga, Hiwi, Aché, Kuna, and Ngobe peoples to investigate health and wellbeing among traditional subsistence cultures. In 2012, Hurtado was inducted as Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
 

Anne Stone

Dr. Anne Stone, Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at ASU, is an anthropological geneticist who investigates population history to better understand how humans and great apes have adapted to their environments, including their disease and dietary environments. Dr. Stone currently serves as a senior editor of Molecular Biology and Evolution.
 

Benjamin Trumble 

Dr. Ben Trumble, Postdoctoral Scholar in Anthropology at UC Santa Barbara and soon to be Assistant Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at ASU, studies the intersection of hormones, health, and behavior among Tsimane subsistence forager-horticulturalists in Bolivia.
 

 

Melissa A. Wilson Sayres

Dr. Melissa Wilson Sayres, Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences at ASU, is a computational biologist studying the evolution of sex chromosomes (X and Y in mammals), differential mutation rates between males and females, and how changes in population history affect the sex chromosomes differently than the non-sex chromosomes. Dr. Wilson-Sayres, a long-time science outreach advocate, also writes at her lab blog.
 

Katie HindeKatie Hinde

Dr. Katie Hinde, Associate Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at ASU, investigates mother’s milk- the food, medicine, and signal that organizes infant development. Hinde co-edited “Building Babies: Primate Developmental Trajectories in Proximate and Ultimate Perspective” released by Springer in 2013, created the Mammals Suck… Milk! Blog for clinicians, scientists, and the general public in 2011, and serves as the EdMedBlog Editor for 2016.